Sites Web : A List Apart

Publié le mardi 8 juillet 2008

⇒ http://www.alistapart.com/

A List Apart Magazine explores the design, development, and meaning of web content, with a special focus on web standards and best practices.

Articles syndiqués tirés de ce site

In Defense of Eye Candy
Avril 2009, par nospam@example.com (Stephen P. Anderson)
Research proves attractive things work better. How we think cannot be separated from how we feel. The next time a boss, client, or co-worker scoffs at the notion that beauty is an important aspect of interface design, point their peepers  (...)
Real Fonts on the Web : An Interview with The Font Bureau’s David Berlow
Avril 2009, par nospam@example.com (David Berlow), nospam@example.com ( Jeffrey Zeldman)
Is there life after Georgia ? We ask David Berlow, co-founder of The Font Bureau, Inc, and the first TrueType type designer, how type designers and web designers can work together to resolve licensing and technology issues that stand between us and real fonts on the  (...)
Findings from the Web Design Survey, 2008
Avril 2009, par nospam@example.com (ALA Staff)
If we, the people who make websites, want the world to know who we are and what we do, it’s up to each of us to stand up and represent. This year, 30,055 of you did just that, taking time out of your busy work day to answer the detailed questions in the second A List Apart Survey. Find out what  (...)
Coaching a Community
Mars 2009, par nospam@example.com (Laura Brunow Miner)
A key to running successful « social networking sites » is to remember that they’re just communities. All communities, online or off, have one thing in common : members want to belong—to feel like part of something larger than themselves. Communicating effectively, setting clear and specific  (...)
The Elegance of Imperfection
Mars 2009, par nospam@example.com (David Sherwin)
Asymmetry, asperity, simplicity, modesty, intimacy, and the suggestion of a natural process : these attributes of elegant design may seem relevant only to a project’s aesthetics. But the most successful web designs reflect these considerations at every stage, from idea to finished product. Bring  (...)
The Elements of Social Architecture
Mars 2009, par nospam@example.com (Christina Wodtke)
While our designs can never control people, they can encourage good behavior and discourage bad. In this excerpt from Information Architecture : Blueprints for the Web 2nd Edition, Christina Wodtke tells us how to make products that delight people and change their lives by remembering the social  (...)
Fluid Grids
Février 2009, par nospam@example.com (Ethan Marcotte)
How awesome would it be if you could combine the aesthetic rigor and clarity of fixed-width, grid-based layouts with the device- and screen size independence and user-focused flexibility of fluid layouts ? Completely awesome, that’s how awesome. And with a little cunning and a tad of easy math,  (...)
In Defense of Readers
Février 2009, par nospam@example.com (Mandy Brown)
As web designers, we concern ourselves with how users move from page to page, but forget the needs of those whose purpose is to be still. Learn the design techniques that create a mental space for reading. Use typographic signals to help users shift from looking to reading, from skimming along  (...)
Filling Your Dance Card in Hard Economic Times
Février 2009, par nospam@example.com (Pepi Ronalds)
In space no one can hear you scream, and in a global economic meltdown, no industry—not even web design—is safe. But as a web designer, your skills and products are suited to ride out hard times, as long as you stay busy. Learn the seven steps to (relative) security in good times or bad : 1. Keep  (...)
The Details That Matter
Janvier 2009, par nospam@example.com ( Kevin Potts)
We no longer lay out pages with composing sticks and straight edges, and design is no longer a trade position requiring a lengthy apprenticeship, but an eye for details is every bit as important today as it was in the early days of graphic arts. Learn the habits of successful designers, who  (...)

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